Fun with WifiDog

Because I don’t have enough spare time projects (this is a joke), I decided to take on the task of adding a must-requested special iPhone/iPod-touch friendly view for the WifiDog authentication server (used by the infamous Île Sans Fil) after being inspired by the WifiDog camp held a few weeks ago at Station C. I finally finally finished up a prototype today. It’s a bit of a hack, but a relatively clean one– hopefully some version of it can be integrated into trunk, and users with mobile devices will have a better experience when they’re on the go in Montréal (or any other area with a community-oriented wifidog deployment: I hear there’s lots).

WifiDog on iPhone yo

For those interested in grubby details, you can track the progress of this work on the WifiDog ticket tracker.

Nexus One

Oh glorious day, the Nexus One is now available for purchase in Canada!

I’ve been feeling less and less enthusiastic about the iPhone lately, in particular after the ridiculous lawsuit against HTC. It’s no secret that we at Navarra have been doing quite a bit of work on that platform, as have my associates at Mindsea. As long as there’s demand from our clients, that won’t change, but as an individual I’m feeling less and less enthusiastic about supporting a company that (through its actions) demonstrates hostility to the ideals of autonomy and innovation that I hold dear. Now that an attractive alternative is available on reasonable terms, I’m seriously considering switching horses in the not-too-distant future.

Adventures in processing with prender

First, I’m overdue in announcing Transit to Go a.k.a. “the iPhone transit map that’s demonstrably more useful than a paper schedule” a.k.a. “your bus departure in 15 seconds or less, no matter where you are”. I wrote up a blog post about it for Mindsea‘s site, if you’re interested in finding out more.

Second, all this transit excitement has made me start thinking about better routing and geometry algorithms again. I’ve been experimenting a bit with Brandon Martin Anderson’s prender framework, used by the infamous Graphserver, and have been pretty happy with the results. It basically lets you do processing visualizations in python (i.e. no Java coding required). Here’s a quick picture of it in action, rendering the Nova Scotian road network, as distributed by geobase.

Nova Scotia as rendered by prender

The neat thing about this framework is that you can render quickly to an arbitrary level of detail, which should prove very useful when troubleshooting the behavior of some of the code I’m working on. If anyone is interested in running the framework on MacOS X (like I was), my fork of the project has the appropriate patches.