Showing posts tagged Telemetry

This Week in Glean: mozregression telemetry (part 2)

May 8th, 2020

Mozilla Telemetry Glean mozregression

(“This Week in Glean” is a series of blog posts that the Glean Team at Mozilla is using to try to communicate better about our work. They could be release notes, documentation, hopes, dreams, or whatever: so long as it is inspired by Glean. You can find an index of all TWiG posts online.)

This is a special guest post by non-Glean-team member William Lachance!

This is a continuation of an exploration of adding Glean-based telemetry to a python application, in this case mozregression, a tool for automatically finding the source of Firefox regressions (breakage).

When we left off last time, we had written some test scripts and verified that the data was visible in the debug viewer.

Adding Telemetry to mozregression itself

In many ways, this is pretty similar to what I did inside the sample application: the only significant difference is that these are shipped inside a Python application that is meant to be be installable via pip. This means we need to specify the pings.yaml and metrics.yaml (located inside the mozregression subirectory) as package data inside setup.py:

setup(
    name="mozregression",
    ...
    package_data={"mozregression": ["*.yaml"]},
    ...
)

There were also a number of Glean SDK enhancements which we determined were necessary. Most notably, Michael Droettboom added 32-bit Windows wheels to the Glean SDK, which we need to make building the mozregression GUI on Windows possible. In addition, some minor changes needed to be made to Glean’s behaviour for it to work correctly with a command-line tool like mozregression — for example, Glean used to assume that Telemetry would always be disabled via a GUI action so that it would send a deletion ping, but this would obviously not work in an application like mozregression where there is only a configuration file — so for this case, Glean needed to be modified to check if it had been disabled between runs.

Many thanks to Mike (and others on the Glean team) for so patiently listening to my concerns and modifying Glean accordingly.

Getting Data Review

At Mozilla, we don’t just allow random engineers like myself to start collecting data in a product that we ship (even a semi-internal like mozregression). We have a process, overseen by Data Stewards to make sure the information we gather is actually answering important questions and doesn’t unnecessarily collect personally identifiable information (e.g. email addresses).

You can see the specifics of how this worked out in the case of mozregression in bug 1581647.

Documentation

Glean has some fantastic utilities for generating markdown-based documentation on what information is being collected, which I have made available on GitHub:

https://github.com/mozilla/mozregression/blob/master/docs/glean/metrics.md

The generation of this documentation is hooked up to mozregression’s continuous integration, so we can sure it’s up to date.

I also added a quick note to mozregression’s web site describing the feature, along with (very importantly) instructions on how to turn it off.

Enabling Data Ingestion

Once a Glean-based project has passed data review, getting our infrastructure to ingest it is pretty straightforward. Normally we would suggest just filing a bug and let us (the data team) handle the details, but since I’m on that team, I’m going to go a (little bit) of detail into how the sausage is made.

Behind the scenes, we have a collection of ETL (extract-transform-load) scripts in the probe-scraper repository which are responsible for parsing the ping and probe metadata files that I added to mozregression in the step above and then automatically creating BigQuery tables and updating our ingestion machinery to insert data passed to us there.

There’s quite a bit of complicated machinery being the scenes to make this all work, but since it’s already in place, adding a new thing like this is relatively simple. The changeset I submitted as part of a pull request to probe-scraper was all of 9 lines long:

diff --git a/repositories.yaml b/repositories.yaml
index dffcccf..6212e55 100644
--- a/repositories.yaml
+++ b/repositories.yaml
@@ -239,3 +239,12 @@ firefox-android-release:
     - org.mozilla.components:browser-engine-gecko-beta
     - org.mozilla.appservices:logins
     - org.mozilla.components:support-migration
+mozregression:
+  app_id: org-mozilla-mozregression
+  notification_emails:
+    - wlachance@mozilla.com
+  url: 'https://github.com/mozilla/mozregression'
+  metrics_files:
+    - 'mozregression/metrics.yaml'
+  ping_files:
+    - 'mozregression/pings.yaml'

A Pretty Graph

With the probe scraper change merged and deployed, we can now start querying! A number of tables are automatically created according to the schema outlined above: notably “live” and “stable” tables corresponding to the usage ping. Using sql.telemetry.mozilla.org we can start exploring what’s out there. Here’s a quick query I wrote up:

SELECT DATE(submission_timestamp) AS date,
       metrics.string.usage_variant AS variant,
       count(*),
FROM `moz-fx-data-shared-prod`.org_mozilla_mozregression_stable.usage_v1
WHERE DATE(submission_timestamp) >= '2020-04-14'
  AND client_info.app_display_version NOT LIKE '%.dev%'
GROUP BY date, variant;

… which generates a chart like this:

This chart represents the absolute volume of mozregression usage since April 14th 2020 (around the time when we first released a version of mozregression with Glean telemetry), grouped by mozregression “variant” (GUI, console, and mach) and date - you can see that (unsurprisingly?) the GUI has the highest usage. I’ll talk about this more in an upcoming installment, speaking of…

Next Steps

We’re not done yet! Next time, we’ll look into making a public-facing dashboard demonstrating these results and making an aggregated version of the mozregression telemetry data publicly accessible to researchers and the general public. If we’re lucky, there might even be a bit of data science. Stay tuned!


This week in Glean (special guest post): mozregression telemetry (part 1)

Feb 28th, 2020

Mozilla Telemetry Glean mozregression

(“This Week in Glean” is a series of blog posts that the Glean Team at Mozilla is using to try to communicate better about our work. They could be release notes, documentation, hopes, dreams, or whatever: so long as it is inspired by Glean. You can find an index of all TWiG posts online.)

This is a special guest post by non-Glean-team member William Lachance!

As I mentioned last time I talked about mozregression, I have been thinking about adding some telemetry to the system to better understand the usage of this tool, to justify some part of Mozilla spending some cycles maintaining and improving it (assuming my intuition that this tool is heavily used is confirmed).

Coincidentally, the Telemetry client team has been working on a new library for measuring these types of things in a principled way called Glean, which even has python bindings! Using this has the potential in saving a lot of work: not only does Glean provide a framework for submitting data, our backend systems are automatically set up to process data submitted via into Glean into BigQuery tables, which can then easily be queried using tools like sql.telemetry.mozilla.org.

I thought it might be useful to go through some of what I’ve been exploring, in case others at Mozilla are interested in instrumenting their pet internal tools or projects. If this effort is successful, I’ll distill these notes into a tutorial in the Glean documentation.

Initial steps: defining pings and metrics

The initial step in setting up a Glean project of any type is to define explicitly the types of pings and metrics. You can look at a “ping” as being a small bucket of data submitted by a piece of software in the field. A “metric” is something we’re measuring and including in a ping.

Most of the Glean documentation focuses on browser-based use-cases where we might want to sample lots of different things on an ongoing basis, but for mozregression our needs are considerably simpler: we just want to know when someone has used it along with a small number of non-personally identifiable characteristics of their usage, e.g. the mozregression version number and the name of the application they are bisecting.

Glean has the concept of event pings, but it seems like those are there more for a fine-grained view of what’s going on during an application’s use. So let’s define a new ping just for ourselves, giving it the unimaginative name “usage”. This goes in a file called pings.yaml:

---
$schema: moz://mozilla.org/schemas/glean/pings/1-0-0

usage:
  description: >
    A ping to record usage of mozregression
  include_client_id: true
  notification_emails:
    - wlachance@mozilla.com
  bugs:
    - http://bugzilla.mozilla.org/123456789/
  data_reviews:
    - http://example.com/path/to/data-review

We also need to define a list of things we want to measure. To start with, let’s just test with one piece of sample information: the app we’re bisecting (e.g. “Firefox” or “Gecko View Example”). This goes in a file called metrics.yaml:

---
$schema: moz://mozilla.org/schemas/glean/metrics/1-0-0

usage:
  app:
    type: string
    description: >
      The name of the app being bisected
    notification_emails: 
      - wlachance@mozilla.com
    bugs: 
      - https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1581647
    data_reviews: 
      - http://example.com/path/to/data-review
    expires: never
    send_in_pings:
      - usage

The data_reviews sections in both of the above are obviously bogus, we will need to actually get data review before landing and using this code, to make sure that we’re in conformance with Mozilla’s data collection policies.

Testing it out

But in the mean time, we can test our setup with the Glean debug pings viewer by setting a special tag (mozregression-test-tag) on our output. Here’s a small python script which does just that:

from pathlib import Path
from glean import Glean, Configuration
from glean import (load_metrics,
                   load_pings)

mozregression_path = Path.home() / '.mozilla2' / 'mozregression'

Glean.initialize(
    application_id="mozregression",
    application_version="0.1.1",
    upload_enabled=True,
    configuration=Configuration(
      ping_tag="mozregression-test-tag"
    ),
    data_dir=mozregression_path / "data"
)
Glean.set_upload_enabled(True)

pings = load_pings("pings.yaml")
metrics = load_metrics("metrics.yaml")

metrics.usage.app.set("reality")
pings.usage.submit()

Running this script on my laptop, I see that a respectable JSON payload was delivered to and processed by our servers:

As you can see, we’re successfully processing both the “version” number of mozregression, some characteristics of the machine sending the information (my MacBook in this case), as well as our single measure. We also have a client id, which should tell us roughly how many distinct installations of mozregression are sending pings. This should be more than sufficient for an initial “mozregression usage dashboard”.

Next steps

There are a bunch of things I still need to work through before landing this inside mozregression itself. Notably, the Glean python bindings are python3-only, so we’ll need to port the mozregression GUI to python 3 before we can start measuring usage there. But I’m excited at how quickly this work is coming together: stay tuned for part 2 in a few weeks.


Conda is pretty great

Jan 13th, 2020

Mozilla Telemetry

Lately the data engineering team has been looking into productionizing (i.e. running in Airflow) a bunch of models that the data science team has been producing. This often involves languages and environments that are a bit outside of our comfort zone — for example, the next version of Mission Control relies on the R-stan library to produce a model of expected crash behaviour as Firefox is released.

To make things as simple and deterministic as possible, we’ve been building up Docker containers to run/execute this code along with their dependencies, which makes things nice and reproducible. My initial thought was to use just the language-native toolchains to build up my container for the above project, but quickly found a number of problems:

  1. For local testing, Docker on Mac is slow: when doing a large number of statistical calculations (as above), you can count on your testing iterations taking 3 to 4 (or more) times longer.
  2. On initial setup, the default R packaging strategy is to have the user of a package like R-stan recompile from source. This can take forever if you have a long list of dependencies with C-compiled extensions (pretty much a given if you’re working in the data space): rebuilding my initial docker environment for missioncontrol-v2 took almost an hour. This isn’t just a problem for local development: it also makes continuous integration using a service like Circle or Travis expensive and painful.

I had been vaguely aware of Conda for a few years, but didn’t really understand its value proposition until I started working on the above project: why bother with a heavyweight package manager when you already have Docker to virtualize things? The answer is that it solves both of the above problems: for local development, you can get something more-or-less identical to what you’re running inside Docker with no performance penalty whatsoever. And for building the docker container itself, Conda’s package repository contains pre-compiled versions of all the dependencies you’d want to use for something like this (even somewhat esoteric libraries like R-stan are available on conda-forge), which brought my build cycle times down to less than 5 minutes.

tl;dr: If you have a bunch of R / python code you want to run in a reproducible manner, consider Conda.


Using BigQuery JavaScript UDFs to analyze Firefox telemetry for fun & profit

Oct 30th, 2019

Mozilla Telemetry

For the last year, we’ve been gradually migrating our backend Telemetry systems from AWS to GCP. I’ve been helping out here and there with this effort, most recently porting a job we used to detect slow tab spinners in Firefox nightly, which produced a small dataset that feeds a small adhoc dashboard which Mike Conley maintains. This was a relatively small task as things go, but it highlighted some features and improvements which I think might be broadly interesting, so I decided to write up a small blog post about it.

Essentially all this dashboard tells you is what percentage of the Firefox nightly population saw a tab spinner over the past 6 months. And of those that did see a tab spinner, what was the severity? Essentially we’re just trying to make sure that there are no major regressions of user experience (and also that efforts to improve things bore fruit):

Pretty simple stuff, but getting the data necessary to produce this kind of dashboard used to be anything but trivial: while some common business/product questions could be answered by a quick query to clients_daily, getting engineering-specific metrics like this usually involved trawling through gigabytes of raw heka encoded blobs using an Apache Spark cluster and then extracting the relevant information out of the telemetry probe histograms (in this case, FX_TAB_SWITCH_SPINNER_VISIBLE_MS and FX_TAB_SWITCH_SPINNER_VISIBLE_LONG_MS) contained therein.

The code itself was rather complicated (take a look, if you dare) but even worse, running it could get very expensive. We had a 14 node cluster churning through this script daily, and it took on average about an hour and a half to run! I don’t have the exact cost figures on hand (and am not sure if I’d be authorized to share them if I did), but based on a back of the envelope sketch, this one single script was probably costing us somewhere on the order of $10-$40 a day (that works out to between $3650-$14600 a year).

With our move to BigQuery, things get a lot simpler! Thanks to the combined effort of my team and data operations[1], we now produce “stable” ping tables on a daily basis with all the relevant histogram data (stored as JSON blobs), queryable using relatively vanilla SQL. In this case, the data we care about is in telemetry.main (named after the main ping, appropriately enough). With the help of a small JavaScript UDF function, all of this data can easily be extracted into a table inside a single SQL query scheduled by sql.telemetry.mozilla.org.

CREATE TEMP FUNCTION
  udf_js_json_extract_highest_long_spinner (input STRING)
  RETURNS INT64
  LANGUAGE js AS """
    if (input == null) {
      return 0;
    }
    var result = JSON.parse(input);
    var valuesMap = result.values;
    var highest = 0;
    for (var key in valuesMap) {
      var range = parseInt(key);
      if (valuesMap[key]) {
        highest = range > 0 ? range : 1;
      }
    }
    return highest;
""";

SELECT build_id,
sum (case when highest >= 64000 then 1 else 0 end) as v_64000ms_or_higher,
sum (case when highest >= 27856 and highest < 64000 then 1 else 0 end) as v_27856ms_to_63999ms,
sum (case when highest >= 12124 and highest < 27856 then 1 else 0 end) as v_12124ms_to_27855ms,
sum (case when highest >= 5277 and highest < 12124 then 1 else 0 end) as v_5277ms_to_12123ms,
sum (case when highest >= 2297 and highest < 5277 then 1 else 0 end) as v_2297ms_to_5276ms,
sum (case when highest >= 1000 and highest < 2297 then 1 else 0 end) as v_1000ms_to_2296ms,
sum (case when highest > 0 and highest < 50 then 1 else 0 end) as v_0ms_to_49ms,
sum (case when highest >= 50 and highest < 100 then 1 else 0 end) as v_50ms_to_99ms,
sum (case when highest >= 100 and highest < 200 then 1 else 0 end) as v_100ms_to_199ms,
sum (case when highest >= 200 and highest < 400 then 1 else 0 end) as v_200ms_to_399ms,
sum (case when highest >= 400 and highest < 800 then 1 else 0 end) as v_400ms_to_799ms,
count(*) as count
from
(select build_id, client_id, max(greatest(highest_long, highest_short)) as highest
from
(SELECT
    SUBSTR(application.build_id, 0, 8) as build_id,
    client_id,
    udf_js_json_extract_highest_long_spinner(payload.histograms.FX_TAB_SWITCH_SPINNER_VISIBLE_LONG_MS) AS highest_long,
    udf_js_json_extract_highest_long_spinner(payload.histograms.FX_TAB_SWITCH_SPINNER_VISIBLE_MS) as highest_short
FROM telemetry.main
WHERE
    application.channel='nightly'
    AND normalized_os='Windows'
    AND application.build_id > FORMAT_DATE("%Y%m%d", DATE_SUB(CURRENT_DATE(), INTERVAL 2 QUARTER))
    AND DATE(submission_timestamp) >= DATE_SUB(CURRENT_DATE(), INTERVAL 2 QUARTER))
group by build_id, client_id) group by build_id;

In addition to being much simpler, this new job is also way cheaper. The last run of it scanned just over 1 TB of data, meaning it cost us just over $5. Not as cheap as I might like, but considerably less expensive than before: I’ve also scheduled it to only run once every other day, since Mike tells me he doesn’t need this data any more often than that.

[1] I understand that Jeff Klukas, Frank Bertsch, Daniel Thorn, Anthony Miyaguchi, and Wesley Dawson are the principals involved - apologies if I’m forgetting someone.